10 Marine Animals to Find in Ipswich Museum

POSTED ON: 21/08/2018

Ipswich Museum is a treasure trove of local Anglo Saxon artifacts, ancient history exhibits and natural history specimens. 


Whilst you're visiting the museum for the Seahorse Family Trail, make sure you find these 10 marine creatures amongst the museum's exhibits; including fossils of extinct giants, living natural wonders and even a few animals you can see in Suffolk!

Here are 10 marine animals you can see in Ipswich Museum:

1. Giant Tortoise Shell

1. Giant Tortoise Shell


These huge tortoises were studied by Charles Darwin when he made his famous visit to the Galápagos in 1835, they can grow to be 1.3m long (the height of small child!) and live on remote islands in the Seychelles and Ecuador.

WHERE TO FIND
In the central room of the museum, look for the giant tortoise shell on the right-hand wall.

2. Narwhal Tusks

2. Narwhal Tusks


The Narwhal, or Narwhale, is a toothed whale that has a large "tusk" and a protruding canine tooth; giving them the title of 'unicorns of the sea'. They're around twice the size of the average human and they live year-round in the cold Arctic waters around Greenland, Canada and Russia. They can live up to 50 years!

WHERE TO FIND
There are two beautiful narwhal tusks in the museum to look out for; just under the first floor walkys in the central room, behind the giraffe cabinet.

3. Batfish

3. Batfish


In the wild, Batfish sometimes play dead when alarmed and the youngsters float motionless on their sides, mimicking dead leaves that have fallen into the water.

WHERE TO FIND
See if you can spot the Batfish among the other marine fish specimens in the central museum room.

4. Flying Fish

4. Flying Fish


Flying fish glide rather than fly, they launch themselves into the air by beating their tail extremely fast and spreading their fins to use as wings, catching the wind and uplifting into the air. When there are lots together they make for quite a sight!

WHERE TO FIND
Amongst the other fish specimens in the cabinets in the museum's main room.

5. Pufferfish

5. Pufferfish


They are called the puffer fish because when they are threatened, they puff up to about twice their normal size by gulping water. They are also believed to be the second most poisonous vertebrate in the world!

WHERE TO FIND
There are quite a few pufferfish throughout the museum, see how many you find!

6. Sawfish

6. Sawfish

The spectacular snouts of sawfish (also known as 'carpenter sharks') are actually a type of ray which a strange "saw" on their heads which is actually a nose extension with teeth! Sawfish use their saw to attack prey and as a sixth sense; the saw can pick-up electric fields which help the animal to hunt.

WHERE TO FIND
Look for the distinctive "nose" of the sawfish in the fish exhibits in the museum's central room.

7. Megladon Tooth

7. Megladon Tooth


An extinct but legendary shark species that lived approximately 23 to 3 million years ago, Megladon (meaning "big tooth" in Latin) is thought to have been twice as big as the biggest Great White Shark ever found!

WHERE TO FIND
You can find a fossil of a Megladon tooth in the back of the museum in the Geology Room.

https://www.allaboutipswich.com/familytrail

8. Otters

8. Otters


Otters are playful and intelligent mammals, they can often be seen sliding around in muddy banks or swimming in rivers. They are semi-aquatic mammals with webbed feet making them fast, agile swimmers.

WHERE TO FIND
Look for the otter exhibits in the wildlife cabinets at the back of the museum on the first floor.

9. Grey Seal

9. Grey Seal


Grey seals are the largest breeding seals found in the UK and half of the world's population of grey seals are found around British coasts. You can often see grey seals along the coast at Felixstowe, Harwich and occasionally even in the marinas in Ipswich!

WHERE TO FIND
There is one grey seal specimen in the back of the museum in the wildlife cabinets on the first floor.

10. Ichthyosaur Skeleton

10. Ichthyosaur Skeleton


A marine dinosaur that became extinct around 112 million years ago, the Ichthyosaur species were very common in the oceans in the late Triassic and early Jurassic periods in Europe and Asia.

WHERE TO FIND
The complete fossil skeleton of the Ichthyosaur can be seen on the first floor at the front of the museum, up the stairs from the entrance.


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